#globalclassroom 2013-14 Closing Webinars – August 15/16

2013-14 Closing Webinar - Slides

 

The past year has been yet another exciting journey for the hundreds of students and teachers participating in the Global Classroom Project!

We have connected via Skype, letters, journals, Google Hangouts, email, wikispaces and more. Students and teachers learned about global and digital citizenship by participating in projects. We continue to grow and learn each year, but more importantly, we continue to be inspired by the incredible passion of children and their teachers across the world.

Please join us for a very special ceremony as we mark the conclusion of a memorable year in our annual “Looking Forwards, Looking Back” webinars. Many of our project managers and lead teachers will reflect and share their projects and stories. These webinars will be a opportunity for teachers to learn more about global projects, or who are looking for some inspiration and connections to create a project of their very own.

The recipients of the Global Classroom Lead Teacher Awards will be announced and formally recognised at this event.

Join us in celebrating our journey in breaking down the walls of our classrooms!

Event Details

The closing webinars will be held on Friday, August 15, and Saturday August 16, in BlackBoard Collaborate.

You can access the live webinar rooms from about 15 minutes prior to the start time by clicking the room link below on your laptop, desktop computer, or mobile device (through the free BlackBoard Collaborate app). Session recordings and slides will be published on this blog next week.

WEBINAR 1: Friday, August 15th (11:00 GMT)

Room Link: https://ca-sas.bbcollab.com/m.jnlp?sid=2012058&username=&password=M.A3305872F6A4AA6B40F5621EA41CD7

Time: 6AM USA (Central), 12PM London, 1PM Cape Town, 7PM Perth, 9PM Sydney. To find out when this in your time zone, please click here.

 

WEBINAR 2: Saturday, August 16th (15:00GMT)

Room Link: https://ca-sas.bbcollab.com/m.jnlp?sid=2012058&username=&password=M.A3305872F6A4AA6B40F5621EA41CD7

Time: 1oAM USA (Central), 4PM London, 5PM Cape Town, 11PM Perth. To find out when this is in your time zone, please click here.

 

Thank you to everyone who has helped make Global Classroom 2013-14 such an incredible project year. We look forward to seeing you, and hearing your #globalclassroom story at our webinars this weekend!

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Flat Stanley Aurasma Project

Original blog post from Mr. Hart’s ITRT Blog

During this school year, I have really enjoyed going over to Kaechele Elementary School about once a month to help teach and integrate the Augmented Reality App, Aurasma into some classrooms.

Mrs. Hyman, the school librarian and information specialist, took the same Flat Stanley Project that most schools do to the next level. As usual, each student had to design their own Flat Self. This is where the similarities ended. Mrs. Hyman had each student create a video including the following:
1. Introduce themselves and their flat self
2. Go through their winter break adventure sequentially, showing their pictures and drawings
3. Wrap it up with a conclusion

After the students completed their projects, Mrs. Hyman used the studio.aurasma program to make the over 100 auras for all the 2nd grade students. The coolest part about this project is that Mrs. Hyman has connected with the infamous Shannon Miller, Teacher Librarian & Technology Integrationist, from the Van Meter School in Iowa. This amazing librarian is completing the same project with her students. Once completed the schools are going to send their Aura Filled Flat Stanleys to each other for the students to scan and meet each other.

We’ve missed a lot of days because of snow the past few weeks, so if Mrs. Hyman has enough time, the next part of the assignment will be to take the Stanleys on a school adventure around Kaechele Elementary giving a tour of their favorite spots. The students will take a picture using the iPads while on the tour, and write about the school adventure. Once completed all the information and pictures will be compiled together into an eBook using Flipsnack, so both schools can see what their Flat Stanleys were up to during their visit to the host schools!

Interested in trying out Aurasma’s studio.aurasma to start creating your own Augmented Reality? Check out this Aurasma 101 Directions I made.

Check out this quick video clip showing some of the creation from the beginning of the project! So fun!

Project Purus … A Grade 4 Student’s Perspective

This guest post comes to us courtesy of Gurtej, a Grade 4 student at Green Timbers Elementary, Surrey, BC, Canada.  It is our pleasure to share his amazing work with the international #globalclassroom community! (It was originally published on his blog here).

So the Mystery of the World Continues …

So the mystery of the world is what makes third world countries so poor? Well there is this great project named Project Purus, Project Purus is an organization that helps schools in third world country’s. They do work for people they don’t even know. Like Govinda, Garrett has never met Govinda but Garrett is still doing lots of work. By the way Govinda is the founder of SAV School in Nepal. You can visit their website here. http://savschool.wordpress.com/ . This video will get you thinking about water. Remember some people have to drink brown water. Keep that in mind. This is what I want to show you.

 http://youtu.be/v7u8ntDE8yE

What if your water looked like that? I think that Project Purus is sending a message out there in the world to leave a positive legacy. What will third world countries look like in ten years? In 20 years? Will there be third world countries in 10 or 20 years? Try to put all of that darkness away and think about it. What if you were in a third world country? What if you had to go through the obstacles in a third world country? In Nepal a water filter is 6,000 Nepal dollars. Here it is 60 dollars. Project Purus turned that gucky brown water in Nepal to clean fresh water with just this:

They changed it to fresh clean water instead of that gucky brown water with just this

They went from this

.

To this see the smiles on their faces. See how happy they are. Their smiles just light my day.

all pictures by Project Purus [https://www.facebook.com/projectpurus]

If we gave these kids the life in Canada for one day they would be the happiest kids on earth. If we went to Nepal for one minute we wouldn’t be able to handle it. All just because of we living in a first world country. How do you think these kids can handle it in a third world country? Because they have to go through these obstacles every single day of their life. We didn’t have to go through it for one minute. These kids have real courage. Don’t be jealous of these kids be happy for them. They finally got clean water. This is their first time. By the way Nepal is actually considered a fourth world country.

What do you think third world countries will be like in 10 years? Or 20 years? Will there be an effect on earth because of third world countries? See you next time. Hope you comment

Inspired By: Project Purus

Thank you for changing especially the world and me. This got me thinking about what do kids have in fourth world countries? Bye

#globalclassroom Conversations & Interviews

Over the past few weeks, we’ve had the privilege of chatting with some amazing educators around the world, sharing #globalclassroom stories through podcasts and a Google “Hangout on Air”.

In case you missed them, we highly recommend taking a few moments to watch / listen to these –

The Global Classroom Project – Every Classroom Matters with Cool Cat Teacher (Podcast)

Despite having to get up at 5AM, I thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to chat with Vicki Davis (@coolcatteacher), one of the two amazing global educators who inspired this very project. You can listen to / download the podcast here.

The Global Classroom @ ACCELN “Hangout on Air”

This was the first ever #globalclassroom “Hangout on Air”, hosted by Amanda Rablin and Roland Gesthuizen from the ACCE Learning Network.

Featuring passionate teachers from Australia, South Africa, USA, and Taiwan – this was one of the most international #ACCELN hangouts ever, and we look forward to returning to the show in 2014. A number of people dropped in while we were on air, so this one is worth watching all the way through!

Global Classroom 2013-14 Launch – Slides & Recordings

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Image via @ICT_Integrator, South Africa

It is hard to believe that we’re embarking on the third year of our #globalclassroom journey, but here we are.

With our formal launch at #globaled13 (and repeat webinar the following day), Global Classroom 2013-14 is officially under-way. It looks to be an incredibly exciting year, with some 20 projects already on the wiki, with a few more in development.

The two launch webinars featured 16 speakers from Australia, New Zealand, Bulgaria, South Africa, Canada, USA, Taiwan, South Africa, and the United Kingdom, and were very well attended.

Webinar 2 featured short presentations from our Partner Charities – Open World Cause and Project Purus, whose work we are keen to promote and support through Global Classroom 2013-14.

Thank you to everyone who made these presentations possible! Your support, dedication, and passion shine are what makes our community so special!

Recordings

Webinar 1

Webinar 2

  • Hosted by Teresa Mackinnon @warwicklanguage), Louise Morgan (@mrsmorgansclass) and Theresa Allen (@tdallen5)
  • BlackBoard Recording

Connecting Globally from a Remote School – Travelling Rhino Project

For the past fortnight we have been hosts of Lesedi, one of five travelling Rhinos sent round the world by Karen Stadler, who I have neer met, but DSCN8901 connected with through email and twitter. Hawea Flat is a small rural school in the South Island of New Zealand and the closest Rhino to us is in a Zoo 5 hours drive away. We knew what a Rhino was and we knew who a poacher was, however we had no comprehension of how the two fitted together and what the devastating consequence of their connection was.

When Lesedi arrived in the mail we had to begin at the beginning. We read books, watched YouTube clips and researched on line. Quickly made connections to the horrific truth and the selfish reasons behind the problem. I have never seen a group of children become enraged so quickly over an issue.

So I simply asked “What can we do about it? We are to far away!” and showed them the distance between South Africa and Hawea Flat on Google Earth.

That is where the kids took over. They showed me that the skills that we have learned in class – ways to solve a problem and find a solution – were important and that when needed the kids could call upon them. In groups they thought of raising money, but then realized that money was not the problem, people were the problem and that not enough people knew about the issue (Kids came up with this – not me).

So, again I said “Ok, it is a people problem. We cant fix that!”The News

Then the class was off again…

“We can make a petition.”
“Put it on a Google Form.”
“Tweet it on our class Twitter and Mr Dyers Twitter.”
“Email it to all the parents.”
“Get them to like it on face book.”
“We can tell the parents at assembly too!”

…and like that the project made an impact on my class and our community. We blogged, tweeted and emailed. Posters and placards were made. Then, we received emails from the local paper asking for interviews. The class and myself have been stopped in the street and told that what we are doing is awesome.

If you have not added you name to this petition then click here to get to the form.

Through my classes participation in Karen’s Travelling Rhino Project we have learned firstly about the plight of the Rhino and raised the awareness of it to our community, but secondly that through projects such as this classrooms no longer need to have walls.

The Global Classroom is a reality and achievable for any educator and all you need is a concept or cause and a PLN to connect you with the world. You can collaborate on a blog, email, Skype, trade letters or tweet with another class, as the technology we have at our classrooms removes the barriers of distance, borders, language and timezone. This project only lasted two weeks, but it changed the way that I look at education and changed the way my class looks at the world.

Sun Rhino

Asking Better Questions … Helping Change Perspectives

This is a guest post from #globalclassroom teacher @LParisi. Lisa blogs at http://thelisaparisi.com, and this post was originally published here.  

Photo shared by the Global Grade 3s.

I belong to an amazing group called The Global Classroom Project.  I love this group.  The teachers have fabulous ideas, talk about the ups and downs of global connections, and seek out collaborators.  If you haven’t looked at the site, you must check it out.

Recently, a blog was posted by Michael Graffin as a reposting of a blog created by a student in Honduras. The class had just completed a mystery skype call, and this student was discussing the awkward, nearly offensive questions asked by the mystery class, which turned out to be in Texas. The two questions in point: “Do you guys use cell phones?” and “How does your house look like?”  You can read her blog to see her view about these questions.

This started a conversation in the Google group about being careful how we communicate with each other and what questions we ask.  So I just want to put in my two cents on the subject.  (You should note that I already talked online with Michael about my response. He, as usual, invites conversation.)

My purpose for Going Global with my class is an idealistic one.  I hope that my kids do a better job than we have.  I want them to understand, accept, and connect with others, regardless of language, religion, race, gender, etc.  I want them to learn that we are all people, deserving of respect and consideration.  And I want them to remember this when it comes time to work with others, have discussions with others, argue with others.  We are all people!

When I was growing up, in the 60s, we were just starting to talk about differences as positive.  “Be yourself.”    “Love who you are and love the one you’re with.”  But, along with loving each other, I was taught not to insult anyone.  And it was insulting to stare, to ask questions, to recognize differences.  So we never even looked at each other.  Really.  If a person of color walked into the restaurant where I was eating, in my very white neighborhood, everyone would look away.  To make eye contact might indicate that you were afraid of them or didn’t want them there.  So, in order to show our respect, we just didn’t look.  Strange but true.  I wasn’t taught to do this.  It was modeled for me.

Did this work?  Of course not.  I learned that people are different and deserve different treatment from one another.  Poor and rich, black and white, abled and disabled.  Labels were important.  They defined for us how to act and how to treat each other.

But I have grown up.  I have learned that this is not the way.  And I have taken it upon myself to model differently for my students and my own child.  I ask questions.  I talk about clothing, jewelry, political beliefs, religious practices.  I ask questions.  And I keep talking.  And I make eye contact.  And I smile.  And I invite people to sit down with me.  And I make plans to go to dinner, the movies, a book club.  And I ask questions.

My students recently did a Mystery Skype call with a class in Texas.  Once we figured out the states we came from, the questions started flying.  They thought we were all gangsters (New Yorkers are usually depicted that way).  We thought they were all cowboys.  After finding out the truth was quite the opposite, we laughed about our misconceptions.

What did we learn?  That Texan students like the same music we do, watch the same movies and tv shows, and shop at the same stores.  Hmmm.  Not so different.  The accents were certainly different but not much else was.  And my students now have a new understanding of Texans and other Southerners.

I work in a very multicultural climate.  We often have conversations about similarities with our religious rituals, our family dinners, and our weekend responsibilities.  We are so different and yet so similar. I don’t ever want my students to stop asking questions.  Eventually, their questions will get more mature, less “insulting”.  And, maybe someday, they won’t need to ask questions about each other.  They will just accept and understand.

What do you think?